Ce Zheng

Postdoctoral Research Scholar

  • Burlington Laboratory 3140

Education

Ph.D 2015

Nuclear Engineering

University of Paris-Sud (France)

M.S 2012

Nuclear Engineering

National Institute for Nuclear Science and Technology (France)

B.S 2010

Physics

Claude Bernard University Lyon 1 (France)

B.S 2010

Physics

Wuhan University (China)

Research Description

Research project: “High Fidelity Ion Beam Simulation of High Dose Neutron Irradiation” (Sponsor: Department of Energy – Nuclear Energy University Program) The objective of this collaborative effort is to demonstrate the capability to predict the evolution of microstructure and properties of structural materials in-reactor and at high doses, using ion irradiation as a surrogate for reactor irradiations.The promise for developing new, advanced nuclear reactor concepts that significantly improve on the safety, economics, waste generation and non-proliferation security of commercial nuclear power reactors, and the extension of life of existing light water nuclear reactors rests heavily on understanding how radiation degrades materials that serve as the structural components in reactor cores.Traditionally, research to understand radiation-induced changes in materials is conducted via radiation effects experiments in test reactors (both fast and thermal), followed by a comprehensive post-irradiation characterization plan. This is a very time consuming process because of the low damage rates that even the highest flux reactors exhibit. In addition the high cost of research on irradiated materials in the face of shrinking budgets put additional constraints on this approach.A promising solution to the problem is to use ion irradiation to irradiate materials to very high doses. The advantages of ion irradiation are many. Dose rates (typically 10-3 to 10-4 dpa/s) are much higher than under neutron irradiation (10-7 to 10-8 dpa/s), which means that 100s of dpa can be reached in days or weeks instead of years. Because there is little activation the samples are not radioactive. Control of ion irradiation experiments is much better than experiments in reactor.Challenges to the implementation of ion irradiation as a surrogate for neutron irradiation include rate effects, small irradiation volumes, accounting for transmutation and the lack of data to establish the equivalence. Addressing these challenges constitutes the main focus of this program. This project will demonstrate the capability to evaluate the behavior of reactor materials at high irradiation doses. This effort includes a benchmarking of the microstructures formed under ion irradiation and neutron irradiation and the resulting mechanical properties by a combined experimental and analytical approach. The outcome of this program will be the establishment of the conditions by which ion irradiation can be used as a surrogate for neutron irradiation in reactor. The project involves characterization of alloys irradiated by single ion irradiation, dual beam ion irradiation and neutron irradiation involves TEM, chemiSTEM, and APT techniques.